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Labor welcomes plan to address housing shortage

Tasmanian Labor welcomes the $50 million investment by the Albanese Government to build more social and affordable housing in Tasmania.

With more than 4,500 Tasmanians waiting nearly 80 weeks on average for somewhere to call home, this funding will help to get more homes built for people in need – something the Liberal State Government has consistently failed to do.

When the state Liberals first came to office 10 years ago in Tasmania, there were fewer than 2,200 people on the list for a home, waiting on average 21 weeks. Wait lists have since doubled, and wait times have quadrupled.

It’s pretty clear that if the Liberals haven’t come up with solutions to Tasmania’s housing crisis by now, they never will.

The Tasmanian Liberal Government will be expected to implement this funding and report regularly to the Federal Government. Tasmanian Labor will continue to hold them to account on this vital action.

Coupled with the Albanese Government’s investment, a future Tasmanian Labor Government would also act to ease the rental crisis by incentivising the development of 1,000 new private rental homes over five years, in addition to existing social housing commitments.

Labor would further increase the supply of social housing by urgently repairing 215 houses that remain untenantable and therefore unused across the state.

We will also regulate the short stay market, starting with a pause on new whole-home short stay permits that will help prevent the loss of any more rental housing from the market.

Labor would also expand the MyHome scheme to assist Tasmanians being able to get a foot in the door of home ownership, by enabling them to buy a home with a deposit of just 2 per cent.

Tasmania needs solutions to the housing crisis and only Labor will help deliver them.


June 18 2023

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